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Will Photoshop Touch turn your iPad into a mobile graphic design center?

        Tech | Other Software

What Critics Say About Photoshop Touch
How useful Photoshop Touch is to you depends on your expectations.
How useful Photoshop Touch is to you depends on your expectations.
Alistair Berg/Digital Vision/Getty Images

Critics agree that, for what it is, Photoshop Touch is impressive. It features a wide array of the basic tools that make Photoshop so popular -- including tutorials for getting you started. Among these basic tools are brush, eraser, warps, fills, Magic Wand, layering, drop shadows, blend modes and color levels. You can adjust your image with Brightness/Contrast, Curves and Reduce Noise. But the Touch version also introduces the Scribble Selection tool, which easily separates foreground from background. Another new function is the Camera Fill, which allows you to use the tablet's camera to take a live picture as a layer within the image (as you take the photo, the display will show your camera's image as a layer within the Photoshop image).

Critics have praised the intuitive interface -- Photoshop users will be able to figure out the application quickly. You can easily pull photos from the camera, Adobe's Creative Cloud, or even Google and Facebook. When you'are done with your image, you can share it on Facebook as well.

Some of the drawbacks of Photoshop Touch come down to the limitations of the tablet technology. For instance, although you can zoom in on the image for more detailed work, tablets aren't (yet) equipped for pixel-level editing. It partly depends on your expectations: While some critics are impressed with the Photoshop Touch version of layers, others lament the absence of advanced layering functions like layer masks and adjustment layers. Likewise, some critics complain that the application offers a painfully limited selection of only 29 text fonts, while others are impressed it has that many.

So, for the serious hobbyist or professional graphic designer, the tablet application just doesn't cut it. In addition, Photoshop Touch has some decent competition in Snapseed, another image editing application for tablets that also costs less [source: Alba].

Adobe, of course, is well aware of these limitations. They don't advertise that it will replace a professional's desktop version (nor would they want to, as it might cannibalize their business). Instead, they suggest it as an extra tool for graphic designers to bring into meetings or out of the office to use for spontaneous ideas, or to quickly give a client a rough idea of what they can do.

So, although Photoshop Touch will turn your tablet into a mobile graphic design center, don't expect it to be as fully functional as the one your traditional computer.


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