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How the Kindle Paperwhite Works


Reviews of the Kindle Paperwhite
The Paperwhite has generally been well-reviewed and Amazon’s library of content is impressive, but it doesn’t ship with a charger and you’ll have to pay to opt out of ads.
The Paperwhite has generally been well-reviewed and Amazon’s library of content is impressive, but it doesn’t ship with a charger and you’ll have to pay to opt out of ads.
Image courtesy of Amazon.com, Inc.

As of first quarter 2013, the Paperwhite has been well received and compared favorably to its competitors, including other Kindles. There have been some complaints about a slight unevenness of the light at the very bottom of the screen (the location of the LEDs), but that complaint also occurs for the other front-lit devices. Kindle usually gets high marks for having a slightly more uniform light distribution than the others. The capacitive touch screen and excellent resolution also put it a smidge above the crowd.

The increase in the prominence of ads is one disadvantage of the Kindle Paperwhite, but one that doesn't apply if you've paid the extra $20 opt-out fee. The fact that you have to pay extra for a wall charger (whereas it came with the device before) is also a point of contention. Perhaps this was to reduce cost, or perhaps the wall charger wasn't thought necessary due to the device's long battery life, but if you travel a lot, you may want to invest in the wall adapter.

The Kindle arguably wins on sheer numbers of available books and periodicals. Aside from millions of books and periodicals for purchase, Kindle also has nearly 300,000 books available for lending to Amazon Prime members. As of early 2013, an Amazon Prime account is $79, and aside from book borrowing, it entitles you to free two-day shipping on many physical items and free streaming of lots of movies and TV shows.

You can also upload PDFs and certain other file formats to your device by e-mailing them to a special personal address that you can find in your Kindle settings. Those documents also end up in the cloud, where you can read them via a Web browser.

There are many viable choices if you want to be able to read e-books away from your computer. You can narrow the choice down a bit by deciding whether you want a dedicated e-reader or a more multipurpose device on which you can also play games and surf the net with ease. Whether you are okay with black and white or would rather have color, whether or not you require audio, how often you want to have to charge the device and your budget are also deciding factors. Once you know your parameters, you can check out the various devices and see which appeals to you most. In the dedicated e-reader arena, Paperwhite is definitely a contender.


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