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How Project Fiona Works

        Tech | Tablet PCs

Project Fiona's Tablet Design
While the central element of Project Fiona looks very much like other tablets, the unit is designed to appeal to gamers.
While the central element of Project Fiona looks very much like other tablets, the unit is designed to appeal to gamers.
Image courtesy Razer; "Assasin's Creed" ©2011 Ubisoft Entertainment.

Project Fiona's body closely resembles an Android tablet in more ways than one. The front is dominated by a 10.1-inch (25.7-centimeter) display and its black bezel. And unlike the typical gaming PC or laptop, that small body houses all of the hardware Razer needs to run games. Like a typical tablet, Fiona's surface is a capacitive touch screen. Project Fiona also includes a three-axis gyroscope, accelerometer, magnetometer, and front- and rear-facing cameras. The biggest difference between Fiona and other tablets is the hardware and software beneath that screen.

At CES 2012, Project Fiona was running on the latest Intel Core i7 processor and the Windows 7 operating system. Razer didn't reveal most of the tablet's technical specifications because hardware like RAM, graphics processor and battery are likely to change before the device becomes a real product. Similarly, Razer said that the device would run Windows 8, which was still in development in January 2012. They did specify that the display resolution is 1280 by 800 pixels, a common resolution for 10.1-inch (25.7-centimeter) tablets.

Tablets are touch screen devices. They don't have physical keyboards, offer few buttons, and run software designed for taps, swipes and gestures. Windows 7 is not that kind of software: Though it does have touch screen support, it was designed first and foremost for keyboards and mice. Microsoft designed Windows 8 with a new user interface geared towards tablets as well as traditional desktops. To improve upon Windows 7's touch controls, Razer designed a custom touch UI for Project Fiona. It provides quick access to basics like installed games, a Web browser and music.

The tablet similarities end when you look beyond the display's bezel and notice the two cylindrical control grips affixed to Project Fiona's main body. Next, we'll look at how they differ from typical game controllers.


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