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How the Deep Web Works


Deep Potential
If we can unlock the deep Web to search professional databases and difficult-to-access deep information, fields such as medicine would immediately benefit.
If we can unlock the deep Web to search professional databases and difficult-to-access deep information, fields such as medicine would immediately benefit.
©shironosov/iStock/Thinkstock

Data in the Deep Web is hard for search engines to see, but unseen doesn't equal unimportant. As you can see just from our newspaper example, there's immense value in the information tucked away in the deep Web.

The deep Web is an endless repository for a mind-reeling amount of information. There are engineering databases, financial information of all kinds, medical papers, pictures, illustrations ... the list goes on, basically, forever.

And the deep Web is only getting deeper and more complicated. For search engines to increase their usefulness, their programmers must figure out how to dive into the deep Web and bring data to the surface. Somehow they must not only find valid information, but they must find a way to present it without overwhelming the end users.

As with all things business, the search engines are dealing with weightier concerns than whether you and I are able to find the best apple crisp recipe in the world. They want to help corporate powers find and use the deep Web in novel and valuable ways.

For example, construction engineers could potentially search research papers at multiple universities in order to find the latest and greatest in bridge-building materials. Doctors could swiftly locate the latest research on a specific disease.

The potential is unlimited. The technical challenges are daunting. That's the draw of the deep Web. Yet there's a murkier side to the deep Web, too -- one that's troubling to a lot of people for a lot reasons.


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