Internet Technology

We look to the Internet for news, socializing, shopping, research and more. From HTML code to instant messaging, we'll break down what's really going on whenever you log on, send an e-mail, visit a popular Web site or post to a blog.


Those little pics that people use to represent their feelings or avoid misunderstandings have been around since the 1990s but have been picking up steam in the 21st century. Why's that?

The undersea cables that transmit the internet across the world are largely unprotected from terrorist or military attack.

The idea behind net neutrality is for people to be able to access the same websites and services equally. Does that no longer hold true for U.S. residents?

To paraphrase John Oliver, "net" and "neutrality" are two spectacularly boring words. But here's the annoying truth: You should care about net neutrality. Learn why.

The very future of the internet will be decided by a five-person panel from the Federal Communications Commission.

And those satellites could provide you with crazy fast internet service.

More than half of people who post comments on news articles haven't read the articles. Is the point of online article to inform, or to provide a forum for discussion?

Trying to get verified on Twitter? It's way more random than you think.

Do we portray a consistent self across different social media platforms? A new study examines the faces we share.

New research out of the Netherlands suggests a way to rethink how we get the data we need from the internet and other networks to our devices — at super-fast speeds.

Google's CAPTCHA will use browsing habits to predict your humanity, only relying on the irritating jumble of letters for suspicious, potential bots.

President Trump is an avid tweeter, and not always the best speller (remember unpresidented?). Can he delete his tweets or are they now public property?

Your college professors probably told you not to use Wikipedia for papers. But they might have been wrong.

A recent cyberattack targeted the heating systems of two apartment buildings in Finland and left residents temporarily without heat. Thanks, internet of things.

Friday's widespread Internet outages hit companies such as Twitter and Spotify hard. Are any systems safe from distributed denial-of-service attacks like these?

Bummed out by the Internet and how much more fun everyone else seems to be having? Seeking out better times offline may ease your FOMO.

The caustic tone of the 2016 presidential race is powerfully affecting ordinary social media users. Will that destroy a lot of social media relationships?

News organizations have been dropping their commenting sections for years, and NPR has recently joined them. But not everyone thinks ditching comments is the way to go.

Google AdWords aren't just for selling products.

Looking for love online? Then stop tooting your own horn so much. Oh, and one other thing.

There's a lot of live-streaming going on lately. As a result, courts may soon be busy defining when it's appropriate to record or broadcast video.

With scores of WiFi networks in place, is wading through an invisible ocean of JPGs, MP3s and more making you sick? BrainStuff leads you through the issue.

The social media giant activated its Safety Check feature for the first time in the U.S. on Sunday after the Orlando attack. Here's the scoop on how it works.

Could you go a full day without doing a single Google search? Or not using Google at all? The Canadian not-for-profit magazine Adbusters thinks you should give it a try.