Data Center Design

  • Physical security is just as important as network security. Data servers are valuable not only because the machines themselves are expensive, but also because the data stored on them could include sensitive information. Malicious hackers don't rely solely on cracking into a computer system electronically -- sometimes they try to infiltrate a system by gaining access to its physical computers.
  • A single data server's power requirements aren't very taxing. But when a data center has hundreds of servers, it's crucial that the center's electric wiring can support the workload.
  • Like all computers, data servers generate heat. Too much heat can impair or damage servers, so the data center needs an effective cooling system to prevent such problems.

Concerns about Cloud Storage

The two biggest concerns about cloud storage are reliability and security. Clients aren't likely to entrust their data to another company without a guarantee that they'll be able to access their information whenever they want and no one else will be able to get at it.

To secure data, most systems use a combination of techniques, including:

  • Encryption, which means they use a complex algorithm to encode information. To decode the encrypted files, a user needs the encryption key. While it's possible to crack encrypted information, most hackers don't have access to the amount of computer processing power they would need to decrypt information.
  • Authentication processes, which require to create a user name and password.
  • Authorization practices -- the client lists the people who are authorized to access information stored on the cloud system. Many corporations have multiple levels of authorization. For example, a front-line employee might have very limited access to data stored on a cloud system, while the head of human resources might have extensive access to files.

Even with these protective measures in place, many people worry that data saved on a remote storage system is vulnerable. There's always the possibility that a hacker will find an electronic back door and access data. Hackers could also attempt to steal the physical machines on which data are stored. A disgruntled employee could alter or destroy data using his or her authenticated user name and password. Cloud storage companies invest a lot of money in security measures in order to limit the possibility of data theft or corruption.

The other big concern, reliability, is just as important as security. An unstable cloud storage system is a liability. No one wants to save data to a failure-prone system, nor do they want to trust a company that isn't financially stable. While most cloud storage systems try to address this concern through redundancy techniques, there's still the possibility that an entire system could crash and leave clients with no way to access their saved data.

Cloud storage companies live and die by their reputations. It's in each company's best interests to provide the most secure and reliable service possible. If a company can't meet these basic client expectations, it doesn't have much of a chance -- there are too many other options available on the market.

To learn more about cloud storage systems and related topics, follow the links on the next page.