Computer Security Systems

Computer security is an increasingly important consideration. From authentication to encryption keys, learn how to keep your computer's hard drive protected and your personal information safe.

Learn More

In the first half of 2021, the number of organizations impacted by ransomware across the globe has more than doubled compared with 2020. Why the surge and how vulnerable is the U.S. to a major cyber attack?

By Sarah Gleim

Private browsers and search engines offer much more protection than using a regular browser or search engine, or a browser with privacy mode-enabled. They can shield your sensitive data, ward off third-party ads and trackers, and provide a safer browsing experience.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Ransomware and its effects are costing businesses and individuals more than $20 billion a year and the threat is not subsiding as malware agents continue to thrive. So how do you protect yourself and your business?

By Francisco Guzman

Advertisement

We're told to change our computer passwords often, but sometimes it can be a hassle to remember how to do it. Here are some easy instructions for changing your Gmail password.

By Jeremy Glass

One survey said 11 percent of Airbnb guests had found a hidden camera in their rented home. Is this legal? And how can you tell if you're being spied on?

By Nathan Chandler

When choosing an antivirus program for your computer or other electronic devices, there's no one-size-fits-all solution, but here are five things you need to consider.

By Patrick J. Kiger

It may seem like you get endless alerts to update your Microsoft Windows system and you might be tempted to skip a few updates. Is there any harm in doing that?

By Nathan Chandler

Advertisement

Zoom bombing – when intruders hijack your videoconference calls or virtual learning sessions – has become a big deal. But how do you stop it?

By Nathan Chandler

What really happens when you transfer your browser to the incognito feature? You may think you're completely anonymous on the internet but that's not what's happening. Still it does have some useful purposes.

By Nathan Chandler

Even if you use the "incognito" setting on your browser, your personal and search data are still being collected at an alarming rate. Private search engines and browsers aim to lessen your digital footprint.

By Dave Roos

To what extent is U.S. intelligence able to conduct surveillance on the internet activity and electronic communications of U.S. citizens?

By Jonathan Strickland & Patrick J. Kiger

Advertisement

Data privacy concerns have prompted some new laws to go into effect in the European Union — and that means changes for consumers in the rest of the world too.

By Dave Roos

HowStuffWorks explains how blockchain technology, which relies upon a shared record of transactions across a peer-to-peer network of computers, is taking over the world.

The U.S. and U.K. issued a joint alert warning that Russian hackers have been targeting devices that help us connect to the internet. Is your digital information at risk?

By Jonathan Strickland

Advertisement

It's the technology behind the meteorically rising bitcoin, and it could be really, really big.

By Jonathan Strickland

The guys at Stuff They Don't Want You To Know talk about whether you can really delete your internet history — and why you want to.

By Diana Brown

Active defense techniques are changing how companies fight back against cybercrooks.

By Dave Roos

2016 was memorable for a whole lot of reasons, and one of them was the massive amount of data stolen.

By Jonathan Strickland

Advertisement

It’s sweet to have a personal assistant like Amazon’s Alexa do your bidding. Except when it does something you didn’t anticipate, like order an adorable dollhouse.

By Jonathan Strickland

Ransomware is coming for us all.

By Julia Layton

Malicious software is threatening the safety of some major cloud hosting services. Here's what a team of researchers is doing to help kick the bad guys out.

By Jonathan Strickland

Advertisement

To thwart hackers from intercepting wireless signals, engineers send a signal through the body, from a smartphone fingerprint scanner to a 'smart lock.'

By Patrick J. Kiger

Researchers have developed experimental versions of a device that could send encrypted messages impossible to intercept or decipher.

By Patrick J. Kiger