Internet Technology

We look to the Internet for news, socializing, shopping, research and more. From HTML code to instant messaging, we'll break down what's really going on whenever you log on, send an e-mail, visit a popular Web site or post to a blog.


Ugh. Another pleasant ride on the World Wide Web ruined by Shockwave plugin errors. What causes these errors, and how can you stop them?

Our digital world has given us a ton of new words and phrases to learn. Get ready to learn yet another one - deep linking. What does it mean? Let's just say it can help keep things connected.

It always seems like the enjoyment of surfing the Web is intermittently ruined by Flash plugin crashes. Why does this happen, and how can you stop it?

Perhaps your friends have posted that Facebook copyright message. Or you've gotten a forward-or-bad-things-will-happen chain email. Technology hasn't killed folklore – it's just created a space where it's shared more quickly.

Want to know where and when the next big flu outbreak will take place? The answer might be as fast, and as close, as a Google search.

Google's broadband Internet and TV service is often spoken of with near-reverence for its ultra-fast speeds. Why is it so much faster than other options?

A connected world stretching from your blender to your thermostat to the satellites overhead? It seemed like a good idea at the time.

Internet sensations like LOLcat and the Harlem Shake didn't happen overnight. OK, maybe they did. But what did these phenomena have in common (besides inanity)? Are there any rules for making pictures, videos or blogs go viral?

About 40 percent of the world's population uses the Web for news, entertainment and communication, but in truth, only a sliver of what we know as the World Wide Web is easily accessible.

Since the advent of the Internet, we've been producing data in staggering amounts. Who's collecting it, and should we be worried?

Six seconds isn't much time to convey an idea, so why is Vine, with its microvideo social network model, so captivating?

If you use the Internet for any length of time, there's probably lots of information floating around out there about you. How do you find it, and can you delete it?

The dot-com bubble produced plenty of companies that spent and grew too quickly and couldn't sustain themselves, but some burned out in spectacular style. Here are 10 tech companies that lived fast and died young.

How many e-mails do you send and receive on any given day? Could you imagine if you were taxed for all that digital communication?

Millions of mobile devices, computers and data centers make up the Internet. Machines join and drop off every second, and each requires electricity. Is it possible to measure how much juice the Internet uses?

Most people think of Google as a giant juggernaut of Internet success. But even the company behind the world's most popular search engine has had its share of blunders.

Klout is an online service that tracks your digital, well, clout. Is it a useful tool for navigating the social networking realm or a useless toy for social media showoffs? We'll consider the pros and cons.

In early 2012, Facebook rolled out its new Timeline, which replaced the personal wall format that users had been accustomed to. Some love it, some hate it -- but what's the logic behind the change?

If you love playing games on Facebook and use any of the integrated apps that involve transactions, you've probably encountered the Facebook Credits system. How do credits work as currency for users?

Failbook is set up to showcase all the wins, fails and facepalms that haunt the spidery halls of Facebook (and other social networks). So what is a "fail," and how do you know if you're committing one?

Google has tried to launch social-based products before with limited success. Could Google Plus break the trend and become the next big social network?

Google is pushing people to abandon the trend of buying fast personal computers in favor of cloud services. What exactly is the Google Cloud, and how could it change computing?

Thanks to music clouds, you can access enormous libraries of music virtually anywhere you can get Internet access. How do they operate, and what are their limitations?

Cloud computing has opened a whole new world of storage and Web interaction options for users, but is it the best way to protect your computer?

Apple's entry into the cloud storage market promises to synchronize all of your devices -- as long as they're made by Apple. How does iCloud stack up to its competitors?