Internet Technology

We look to the Internet for news, socializing, shopping, research and more. From HTML code to instant messaging, we'll break down what's really going on whenever you log on, send an e-mail, visit a popular Web site or post to a blog.

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Wikipedia is one of the most popular sources of knowledge on the internet. But more than 80 percent of its contributors are men. And that shapes the content, often in negative ways.

By Stell Simonton

Gmail is one of the most popular email suites out there today. But if you're not backing up your data, you could be in for a huge loss if the site goes haywire.

By Nathan Chandler

When was the last time you felt different? What childhood memory shaped your world? If you like discussing questions like this, you'll love being able to be part of The Question Booth podcast.

By Kathryn Whitbourne

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Whether you love or hate Facebook, the Cambridge Analytica scandal exposed major flaws in the online platform. So where do we go from here?

By Diana Brown

Online dating apps are aiding social integration because people are interacting with others to whom they previously had no access.

By Alia Hoyt

Having a tough time breaking up with Facebook? Then at least be sure your private information is secure and protected.

By John Donovan

Twitter bots seem to be with us to stay, but how do they work? And are they all bad?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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The popularity of neighborhood social networks keeps exploding. But building community comes with some unintended consequences.

By Dave Roos

Those little pics that people use to represent their feelings or avoid misunderstandings have been around since the 1990s but have been picking up steam in the 21st century. Why's that?

By Nathan Chandler

The undersea cables that transmit the internet across the world are largely unprotected from terrorist or military attack.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The idea behind net neutrality is for people to be able to access the same websites and services equally. Does that no longer hold true for U.S. residents?

By Jonathan Strickland & Kathryn Whitbourne

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To paraphrase John Oliver, "net" and "neutrality" are two spectacularly boring words. But here's the annoying truth: You should care about net neutrality. Learn why.

By Dave Roos

The very future of the internet will be decided by a five-person panel from the Federal Communications Commission.

By John Donovan

And those satellites could provide you with crazy fast internet service.

By Tracy Staedter

More than half of people who post comments on news articles haven't read the articles. Is the point of online article to inform, or to provide a forum for discussion?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Trying to get verified on Twitter? It's way more random than you think.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Do we portray a consistent self across different social media platforms? A new study examines the faces we share.

By Chris Opfer

New research out of the Netherlands suggests a way to rethink how we get the data we need from the internet and other networks to our devices — at super-fast speeds.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Google's CAPTCHA will use browsing habits to predict your humanity, only relying on the irritating jumble of letters for suspicious, potential bots.

By Patrick J. Kiger

President Trump is an avid tweeter, and not always the best speller (remember unpresidented?). Can he delete his tweets or are they now public property?

By John Perritano

Your college professors probably told you not to use Wikipedia for papers. But they might have been wrong.

By Kathryn Whitbourne

A recent cyberattack targeted the heating systems of two apartment buildings in Finland and left residents temporarily without heat. Thanks, internet of things.

By Jonathan Strickland

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Friday's widespread Internet outages hit companies such as Twitter and Spotify hard. Are any systems safe from distributed denial-of-service attacks like these?

By Jonathan Strickland

Bummed out by the Internet and how much more fun everyone else seems to be having? Seeking out better times offline may ease your FOMO.

By Lauren Vogelbaum