Internet Technology

We look to the Internet for news, socializing, shopping, research and more. From HTML code to instant messaging, we'll break down what's really going on whenever you log on, send an e-mail, visit a popular Web site or post to a blog.

Anyone can open a Twitter account, but what does it take to command an audience in 140 characters or less?

Trying to post repeat information to all your social networks can be a drag. If you have a message you want to broadcast widely, is there a way to do it easily?

Sometimes, your Facebook Friends list simply gets out of control. How do you determine who makes the cut? Don't stress. We'll help.

Want to optimize your Twitter feed by following the right people? We'll help you sort and prioritize your list.

Twitter might seem like an exercise in (entertaining) brevity, but even it can get out of control. What are the best ways to tame your feed?

Most of us understand that the Internet only has the information that we provide it: "Think before you click" is a common warning for all users. But for a site like Facebook, that can get complicated. Does Facebook share your personal information?

It's fun to point out the faces of people you know in real albums, and you can do the same thing with Facebook phototagging. What are photo tags, and is there a faster way to identify your friends?

These days, all sorts of people -- from celebrities to average Joes -- post pictures on Twitter. How do they do it? Find out in How Twitpic Works.

iTunes is like most other complex tools. It works well right out of the box, but it can become a powerful, personalized media manager with a few simple modifications and adjustments. So, what can you do to get the most out of iTunes?

Do you want to know how to use Google Earth to show and share GPS routes and tracks from your travels? Learn how to how to use Google Earth to show and share GPS routes and tracks in this article.

You'd like to learn how to put a photo album on a Web page and share it with others. Learn in this article how to put a photo album on a Web page.

You'd like to know how to e-mail some old pictures and new digital ones your family and friends. Learn how to e-mail pictures in this article.

You can organize e-mails by assigning mail to specific files for later retrieval. Learn about how to organize e-mails in this article.

Often, the Web site you see on your smartphone is quite different from the version you see on your computer screen. How do Web servers know you're using a mobile device, and how are pared-down mobile pages designed?

If you know how to get a Wi-Fi connection, you can connect all your computers to the Internet at once. Learn about how to get Wi-Fi connection with Windows Vista.

Facebook is more than just a social network; it is also an advertising platform. Learn how to get rid of the ads on Facebook in this article.

Facebook is a great way to network and contact people instantly when they are online, but sometimes you may want to remain invisible. Learn how to go offline when using Facebook in this article.

Privacy settings on Facebook can be customized to hide certain friends. Learn how to hide friends on Facebook in this article.

Proxy servers and proxy server software can help you hide your IP address. Learn how to hide an IP address from this article.

If you have Windows 7 or Windows Vista, you'll find your temporary Internet files on your C drive. Learn how to find temporary Internet files from this article.

Your wireless network can’t function without an SSID. Learn what SSID stands for in this article.

A blogroll is a listing of other blogs that you either subscribe to or that you recommend. Learn what a blogroll is in this article.

Use the Facebook application, Notes, to add a blog to your Facebook page. Learn how to add a blog to your Facebook page from this article.

You can change default Facebook settings to enable or block friends from sharing specific content, such as posts or pictures. Learn how to unhide friends in this article.

Many print publications are turning to paywalls -- online systems charging visitors to access Web content -- to bridge revenue gaps. But are people who have gotten used to accessing such information gratis ready to pony up?